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30 Things to Consider when creating a Parenting Plan

1.  What makes your child or children special?

2. How does your child or children react to change?

3. What strategies would help the child or children handle change?

4. Who else is important in your child's or children's lives?

5. What do you and your child or children like to do together?

6. What are your plans and wishes for your child or children?

7. How do you and the other parent share responsibilty and time with your child or children now?

8. How does the child or children like the current living and parenting arrangements?

9. Have there been changes in behavior since the separation or divorce?

10. How do you and your child or children handle and resolve conflict?

11. Are you happy with the current arrangements?

12. Have you discussed your divorce or separation with your child or children?

13. Do you feel that counseling would be beneficial for the child or children?

14. Are there any special medical needs for your child or children?

15. Are there any adult relatives or friends with whom the child or children should or should not have a close relationship or contact with?

16. Does either parent have a new relationship or plan to remarry?

17. Does either parent plan to move a distance that would make seeing the child or children on a weekly basis?

18. What are each parent's work schedule?

19. Are there any court orders in place right now that would effect your new parenting plan?

20. What types of activities does your child or children participate in ( sports, school, religious, etc )?

21. Do you want your parenting plan to address domestic violence?

22. Do you want your parenting plan to address drug or alcohol abuse?

23. Do you have any special concerns about your relationship with the other parent?

24. Have ant counselors, school teachers, or therapists voiced concerns about your child's or children's behavior since the separation?

25. Think about ways that you can support your child's or children's relationship with the other parent.

26. Think about ways each parent can help the child or children address feelings, reactions, or concerns about the separation or divorce.

27. Think about ways to reduce conflict between the parents when negotiating agreements, exchanging the child or children, or addressing the child's or children's needs, interests, and activities.

28. What are the times when both parents are available to care for the child or children?

29. How can you as parents show the child or children that even though you are living apart that you both love and respect the child or children?

30. Are you as parents willing to do whatever it takes to allow the child or children to have as stable and loving environment after your separation and divorce as it was before?

These are but thirty questions to assist you in starting to think about what you would like to see in a parenting plan.There are many more questions for you to consider that will be brought forward in the mediation process.

Blessed be the flexible, for they shall not get bent out of shape - Written on wall of an Indiana Amish Shop

 

 

 

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